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FRCN Year-in-Review

Chief David Crate holds framed certificate amongst council at the First Nations Financial Management Board Ceremony Nov. 28, 2017.

Chief David Crate holds framed certificate amongst council at the First Nations Financial Management Board Ceremony Nov. 28, 2017.

By Twyla Siple

asiple@postmedia.com

2017 was a “very good year” for Fisher River Cree Nation, according to Chief David Crate. 

 

Not only was he himself honored to receive the Order of Canada for outstanding achievement, dedication to the community and service to the nation; but his community became the first certified First Nation in Manitoba, and only the sixth in Canada, to achieve certification in Financial Management System Certification during a Ceremony at the Community Hall by the First Nations Financial Management Board. 

 

“It was a super year for the community,” said Crate, who looks forward to the opening of their new school that began construction in July, the new community centre, and the joint work they are doing with Peguis First Nation, and the RM of Fisher on a community led hospital at Percy E. More. “Hopefully we will be able to take over the hospital as it’s one of the only federal hospitals left in Canada.”

 

A name that stood out to Crate was Dr. Michael Hart, a citizen of Fisher River Cree Nation, Acting Director and an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Social Work at the University of Manitoba. 

 

Hart has worked in areas of child welfare, mental health, addictions, and family therapy, and was the Co-Director of the Manitoba First Nations’ Centre for Aboriginal Health Research. He spoke at the Faculty of Social Work’s 9th Annual Symposium Social Work Research and Social Justice: A Call to Action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Mar. 27 at MacEwan Conference and Event Centre in Calgary. 

 

Crate also wanted to mention how proud he was of the athletes that competed at the North American Indigenous Games in 2017 because they did “very well” representing FRCN.

 

Some of Crate’s not so favorite moments included “the loss of elders in the community. We lost some young people too. We want to think about them,” he added. 

 

Crate was re-elected for another two-year term in August 2017, making this his eighth straight term. He has been elected 12 times in total, and looks forward to continuing his community’s development and long term planning along side his Council. 

 

“Every year the council sets a strategic plan and reviews it. We are in about year seven of our 20 year plan,” Crate said. 

 

“We are looking at more business development for the community in 2018.”

 



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