News Manitoba

Riverton's finest get their wings

Michel Forest
Riverton Collegiate Institute graduating student Joel Dyck receives the Governor General's Academic Medal from Arborg-Riverton music teacher Renise Mlodzinski. PHOTO by MICHEL FOREST

Riverton Collegiate Institute graduating student Joel Dyck receives the Governor General's Academic Medal from Arborg-Riverton music teacher Renise Mlodzinski. PHOTO by MICHEL FOREST

The afternoon of June 22 was a memorable one for 26 young men and women as they saw their careers as high school students at Riverton Collegiate Institute come to a close, the 50th graduating class in the school's history.

Principal Thomas Kowalchuk reminded them that, unlike a stunt like crossing over Niagara Falls on a tightrope, their future actions should be the kind that strive to "improve their communities and enrich other people's lives."

He also said that he was satisfied that the school had done its job in developing the students' accountability and integrity and that as they were being set free into the world as adults they would be expected to do good things and extend kindness to strangers.

Sandra Davies of the Evergreen School Division added to that with a message of congratulations that concluded with the remark that "If we hold our children to high standards, they will do great things."

Division superintendent Paul Cuthbert, who was recently one of four Manitoba educators that were awarded the Global Citizenship Award by the The Manitoba Council for International Cooperation (MCIC), spoke of the importance of students moving forward by developing and sustaining good relationships with their families and finding what each of them was good at, their passion in life as well as "aiming high and seeking to succeed."

Two dozen scholarships and bursaries were awarded, and the Governor General's Academic Medal (to the student who attained the highest grade average during the final two years of high school) was claimed by Joel Dyck.

Guest speaker Lloyd Roche spoke at length on the importance of embracing the technologies of today and tomorrow and of the importance of always returning to one's community throughout their adult years.

Valedictorians Amy Collins and Leslie Einarson proceeded with the expected humorous observations on each one of their graduating classmates and concluded with a remark similar to that of Roche that emphasized the importance of community when they said that "Part of where you are going is knowing where you come from..."

Final acknowledgments came from Hannah Bjornson and Hailee Williams-Hurdell, who thanked teachers, the school's principal and administrators, Tammy Einarson for "her 100% support all year" as well as a big thanks to all the parents' committees for making it all possible.

michel.forest@sunmedia.ca



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